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dc.rights.licenseAttribution 4.0 International*
dc.contributor.authorMartin-Mayor, Alain
dc.contributor.authorBou-Ali, M. Mounir
dc.contributor.otherGonzález, Itziar
dc.contributor.otherTijero, Maria
dc.contributor.otherAcosta, Victor
dc.contributor.otherBerganzo, Javier
dc.contributor.otherCastillejo, Francisco
dc.contributor.otherSoto, Jose Luis
dc.date.accessioned2022-04-28T15:33:29Z
dc.date.available2022-04-28T15:33:29Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.issn2072666Xen
dc.identifier.otherhttps://katalogoa.mondragon.edu/janium-bin/janium_login_opac.pl?find&ficha_no=119075en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11984/5550
dc.description.abstractThe choice of substrate material in a chip that combines ultrasound with microfluidics for handling biological and synthetic microparticles can have a profound effect on the performance of the device. This is due to the high surface-to-volume ratio that exists within such small structures and acquires particular relevance in polymer-based resonators with 3D standing waves. This paper presents three chips developed to perform particle flow-through separation by ultrasound based on a polymeric SU-8 layer containing channelization over three different substrates: Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA); Pyrex; and a cracked PMMA composite-like structure. Through direct observations of polystyrene microbeads inside the channel, the three checked chips exhibit their potential as disposable continuous concentration devices with different spatial pressure patterns at frequencies of resonance close to 1 Mhz. Chips with Pyrex and cracked PMMA substrates show restrictions on the number of pressure nodes established in the channel associated with the inhibition of 3D modes in the solid structure. The glass-substrate chip presents some advantages associated with lower energy requirements to collect particles. According to the results, the use of polymer-based chips with rigid substrates can be advantageous for applications that require short treatment times (clinical tests handling human samples) and low-cost fabrication.en
dc.language.isoengen
dc.publisherMDPIen
dc.rights© 2015 by the authors; licensee MDPIen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.subjectlab-on-chipen
dc.subjectultrasonic manipulationen
dc.subjectpolymeric resonatorsen
dc.subjectacoustic tweezersen
dc.subjectparticle enrichmenten
dc.titleOptimizing Polymer Lab-on-Chip Platforms for Ultrasonic Manipulation: Influence of the Substrateen
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articleen
dcterms.accessRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccessen
dcterms.sourceMicromachinesen
dc.description.versioninfo:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersionen
local.contributor.groupMecánica de fluidoses
local.description.peerreviewedtrueen
local.description.publicationfirstpage574en
local.description.publicationlastpage591en
local.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.3390/mi6050574en
local.contributor.otherinstitutionCSICes
local.contributor.otherinstitutionIkerlan, S. Coop.es
local.contributor.otherinstitutionHospital General Universitario de Elchees
local.source.detailsVol. 6. Nº 5. Pp. 574-591. Published 7 May,en


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Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution 4.0 International